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Projected emissions vary with coal and nuclear plant retirements

World Coal,


According to the latest data from the US Energy Information Administration, projected emissions of CO2 will vary according to coal and nuclear power plant retirements.

Significant retirements of nuclear and coal power plants in the US could change the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emitted by the electric power sector. EIA's Annual Energy Outlook 2014 (AEO2014) features several accelerated retirements cases that represent conditions leading to additional coal and nuclear plant retirements in order to examine the potential energy market and emissions effects of the loss of this capacity. CO2 emissions are significantly reduced when compared to the Reference case in side cases with accelerated coal retirements. CO2 emissions increase slightly in the Accelerated Nuclear Retirements case. Natural gas and renewables are the primary replacements for lost capacity in each scenario.

Coal (74%) and natural gas (24%) power plants accounted for almost all of the CO2 emitted by the electric power sector in 2012. Nuclear power and renewables do not emit CO2.

The Accelerated Nuclear Retirements case projects CO2 emissions that are 4% higher compared with the Reference case in 2040. In this side case, natural gas-fired generation is projected to be 13% higher than in the Reference case. However, renewables generation in the Accelerated Nuclear Retirements case increases 5% relative to the Reference case, which moderates the emissions impact. Coal generation does not differ significantly between the two cases.

Like in the Accelerated Nuclear Retirements case, natural gas generation makes up for most of the lost capacity in the Accelerated Coal Retirements case, resulting in a 19% increase in natural gas generation relative to the Reference case in 2040. However, because generation using natural gas emits less CO2 than coal, emissions decrease by 20% relative to the Reference case over that period. A 10% increase in renewable generation relative to the Reference case also serves to lower overall emissions.

Emissions are slightly higher in the combined Accelerated Coal and Nuclear Retirements case than in the Accelerated Coal Retirements case, because natural gas-fired generation replaces some nuclear power generation. However, the effect of the coal-fired capacity retirements keeps emissions 14% below the Reference case level in 2040.

The coal and nuclear retirements resulting from each case examined are shown in the graphs above. Natural gas-fired combined-cycle units are favored sources of new capacity in all cases examined because of competitive fuel prices and relatively moderate capital costs. Renewable capacity is also added, primarily as a result of state renewable portfolio standards (RPS) and federal tax incentives early in the projection and increased economic competitiveness towards the end of the projection in all cases.

Source: US Energy Information Administration.


Edited by Katie Woodward

Read the article online at: https://www.worldcoal.com/power/28042014/coal_and_nuclear_emissions_in_us_766/


 

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